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Food Poisoning Lawyer

Food poisoning lawyer Tony Coveny, Ph.D., is licensed in the state of Texas, with his office in Houston, Texas.

27715 Guthrie Ridge Lane, Katy TX 77494.  phone 713-306-3880.  A Texas food poisoning lawyer who has worked with victims of Vibrio, Shigella,  salmonella, listeria, E. coli, Hepatitis, and other pathogens . If you need a Salmonella Lawyer, aListeria Lawyer, an E. coli Lawyer, a Hepatitis Lawyer, or any other food poisoning lawyer, give me a call!

Lawyer/Attorney anthony c coveny pllc © All Rights Reserved.  Food Poisoning Lawyer here to help you with filing your food poisoning lawsuit!

can i file A CAmpylobacter lawsuit?


By Texas Campylobacter Lawyer Tony Coveny 


Campylobacter food poisoning is dangerous and all too common.  The source of Campylobacter (like in E. coli, Salmonella, or Listeria cases ) is usually human or animal feces, unwashed hands, unwashed or cleaned vegetables or produce, or even the common buffet line.  Campylobacter is often linked to unpasteurized milk, vegetables, and handling of animals - but as a campylobacter lawyer, I have observed a number of well publicized outbreaks where the source was never identified.   In part, this is because it can be spread so easily.  About 1.3 million Americans get campylobacter every year!  

Campylobacter


By Texas Campylobacter Lawyer Tony Coveny


Campylobacter is the most common of bacterial pathogens in food born outbreaks.  It can easily survive on counters and food surfaces for enough time to pass to other food or people at a restaurant or in a home. In a Campylobacter Outbreak, proof is often provided in a positive stool test; epidemiological evidence at the source; and circumstantial evidence of multiple patrons getting sick at the same time with a single common source.  As a Campylobacter lawyer, I look for ways to trace back the illness to a single source, and work with the documents provided by medical and public health personnel to try and establish causation.  I many cases, no defendant can be identified, as it is often difficult to prove what food made a person ill.  But when other corroborating evidence is available, a case can be made for a Campylobacter lawsuit or claim.


GUILLAIN-BARRÉ SYNDROME


THE RARE BUT DANGEROUS SIDE EFFECT 

By Texas Campylobacter Lawyer Tony Coveny


According to Web MD, Guillain-Barré syndrome is often noted first by the symptoms in the extremities, including tingling and weakness.   The sensation is often likened to "pins and needles" in the wrists, ankles, toes and fingers.  But these symptoms often spread to the whole body, causing paralysis.  The condition can also lead to a rapid heart rate, irregular blood pressure, difficulty breathing or swallowing, and difficult bladder control.  The onset of Guillain-Barré syndrome is often infectious disease, such as a respiratory illness, Campylobacter, or the stomach flu.  

There is no cure for Campylobacter precipitated Guillain-Barré syndrome, but most victims recover in a matter of weeks of months.  In some the lingering fatigue and tenderness or feelings in the extremities endures for a significant period of time.

Note:  There is little or no evidence that other pathogens lead to Guillain-Barré syndrome, but E. coli has been known to lead to Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS); Salmonella has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and irritable bowel disease (IBD) and some cases of reactive arthritis;  and Listeria to the still birth or death of unborn children.

Cyclospora

Food Poisoning Caused by a Parasite - Cyclospora, the Imported Bug

By Texas Cyclospora Lawyer Tony Coveny


Cyclospora is a relatively rare parasite, not indigenous to the United States of America, but one that turns up every now and again when some imported food crosses into the States.  Very recently, it has been tied to a number of imported goods, mostly agricultural foods, from Mexico, including lettuce and salad mix brought into the U.S. for service at Olive garden and Red Lobster restaurants owned and operated by Darden Corporation in restaurants in Nebraska and Iowa.   Another outbreak was inked to Cilantro from Mexico.  These are only two of the major identified Cyclospora outbreaks linked to Mexican produce in recent years.  There have been no major outbreaks of Cyclospora in 2017 - yet.  

Do I have Cyclospora?

by Cyclospora lawyer Tony Coveny


Cyclospora is a hard bug to diagnose - it is easy to ingest and the symptoms are often like other food poisoning, but also have a great dal of bloating and gas.  The come and go, so people often feel they have overcome the illness only to have it start again.  It leads to loss of appetite and often weight loss.  Often these victims are thought to have a bacterial infection, so the y have a stool culture done.  Stool cultures do not reveal Cyclospora.  They may also have an abdominal and pelvic CT, which will not usually show gastroenteritis or colitis - so the physicians are flummoxed.  Even the most astute physicians, who order an Ova and Parasite test (stool test, often referred to as a OP test) are often disappointed, as the traditional test does not observe the Cyclospora oocysts.   A specific test is necessary to detect Cyclospora, and even then, two and three attempts are often needed.


In the interim, the victims of a Cyclospora outbreak are often incredibly ill, very scared, and suffer with no answers.  The ironic thing is that Cyclospora infection in very easy to cure.  Bactrim is an antibiotic that quickly and efficiently destroys Cyclospora.  It operates quickly. So the cure is easy and fast, but the diagnosis and treatment are often withheld for many weeks if not months.  Often only the publication of an outbreak makes victims and their physicians turn their attention to Cyclospora as a possibility.

Many Cyclospora Lawsuits Settling

By Texas Cyclospora lawyer Tony Coveny


The massive 2013 outbreak of Cyclospora, leading to a number of Cyclospora lawsuits across the nation, has been followed by another record year of Cyclospora cases in 2014.  The 2013 cases were mostly left unresolved, with no source ever identified - the notable exceptions are in Texas and in Nebraska/Iowa, where two distinct outbreaks were identified all the was back to the producers of salad mix and cilantro from Mexico.  Cilantro from Puebla Mexico entered the US and was sold to many, including Mex Luna, a produce company that distributed the cilantro to places like Bob's Taco Station.    In Nebraska and Iowa, the culprit was Taylor Farms lettuce mix, also from Mexico, sold to Olive Garden and Red Lobster owned by Darden Corporation at locations in those states.


NOTE:  2014-2015 saw yet another significant spike in Texas Cyclopspora cases, no source has yet been identified.  We are monitoring 2016.


Identifying the Defendant


By Cyclospora lawyer Tony Coveny


If you are properly diagnosed, there is still the difficulty of identifying a defendant who is responsible.  The CDC also notes that the incubation period can be weeks, not hours, and so tracing it back to the meal you ate that was suspect is difficult.  The key Is often in the hands of regulatory and health department agencies, including the CDC, the FDA and USDA, FSIS, and state and local health departments.Traditional PFGE analysis, such as in E. coli, salmonella or Listeria cases is not available.


What  is a  Traceback investigation?


A trace-back investigation usually entails identifying a "cluster" of Cyclospora victims, or a statistically high number of victims in a short period of time and using questionnaires find a common source of food amongst the various injured victims. (This is also the traditional method in Cyclospora, Botulism, and Hepatitis cases.)


What is epidemiological Evidence?


Epidemiological evidence is when the restaurant or product, such as parsley, cilantro, lettuce, or other product that is usually imported form a tropical environment, believed to be the cause is tested independently and found to have Cyclospora . (Epidemiological testing is also common in bacterial outbreaks, such as E. coli, Salmonella, Listeria, Shigella, and Campylobacter).

Cyclospora

Food Poisoning Caused by a Parasite - Cyclospora, the Imported Bug

By Texas Cyclospora Lawyer Tony Coveny


Cyclospora is a relatively rare parasite, not indigenous to the United States of America, but one that turns up every now and again when some imported food crosses into the States.  Very recently, it has been tied to a number of imported goods, mostly agricultural foods, from Mexico, including lettuce and salad mix brought into the U.S. for service at Olive garden and Red Lobster restaurants owned and operated by Darden Corporation in restaurants in Nebraska and Iowa.   The salad mix and/or lettuce was imported from Mexico by Taylor Fresh Foods.  This was only one of two major , identified Cyclospora outbreaks linked to Mexican produce.  The other was from cilantro imported into Texas and used at Mexican cuisine restaurants including Bob's Tacos. 

Do I have a Cyclospora Lawsuit?

Filing a Cyclospora Lawsuit


By Texas Cyclospora lawyer Tony Coveny


Filing a Cyclospora lawsuit is much like filing any personal injury lawsuit, but it is based upon the proper diagnosis of Cyclospora and the ability to trace the Cyclospora infection to a proper defendant. 

Cyclospora Diagnosis

Being properly diagnosed is difficult, as Cyclospora is not one of the obvious problems that come to mind when medical professionals see a person with gastroenteritis-like-symptoms. A standard bacterial stool test will not uncover Cyclospora, and what is even worse, even a standard parasite stool test will more likely than not miss Cyclospora.  Cyclospora needs to be specifically tested for, and then two or three tests are often necessary.  Unlike bacterial stool tests where the feces is monitored for bacterial growth, the professionals who screen for Cyclospora are actually looking for the parasite or Ova, and only by seeing them can Cyclospora be diagnosed clearly.  

It would be easy if people immediately told their doctors that they suspected Cyclospora, but in my experience as a Cyclospora lawyer, most people often think just think they have the flu, and because it can come and go, ignore it for a while or are treated inappropriately.


KEY SIGNS OF CYCLOSPORA

What do I look for if I think I have Cyclospora?  That really is a medical question, but the CDC gives ood direction on this:

  • frequent and watery diarrhea
  • often explosive bowel movements
  • gas and bloating
  • loss of appetite
  • significant weight loss
  • abdominal pain
  • nausea ad upset stomach
  • extreme fatigue
  • vomiting, body aches, headache, fever, and other flu-like