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Food Poisoning Lawyer

Food poisoning lawyer Tony Coveny, Ph.D., is licensed in the state of Texas, with his office in Houston, Texas.

27715 Guthrie Ridge Lane, Katy TX 77494.  phone 713-306-3880.  A Texas food poisoning lawyer who has worked with victims of Vibrio, Shigella,  salmonella, listeria, E. coli, Hepatitis, and other pathogens . If you need a Salmonella Lawyer, aListeria Lawyer, an E. coli Lawyer, a Hepatitis Lawyer, or any other food poisoning lawyer, give me a call!

Lawyer/Attorney anthony c coveny pllc © All Rights Reserved.  Food Poisoning Lawyer here to help you with filing your food poisoning lawsuit!

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food poisoning lawyer: Seasonal Update on Norovirus 


By Food Poisoning Attorney Tony Coveny, Ph.D.


As the winter wanes, the Norovirus season is at about the mid-point.  Until the middle of April, Norovirus Sydney  (the current most common strain, following  the outbreak a few years ago of Norovirus New Orleans) will cause untold millions of illnesses (an average of 21 million per year).  A quarter of the reported Norovirus outbreaks will be linked to food or a food establishment, such as the Golden Corral which in December of 2012, sickened at least 344 individuals.  The best defense against Norovirus is good personal hygiene, but this will not prevent food borne Norovirus from sickening many this winter.  Ironically, as a Food poisoning lawyer, I get many calls each week about illnesses from eating food.  Without a stool test, it is very difficult to determine what made a person sick, and the default in most medical offices will be the generic "Norovirus" - which is often simply referred to as the "stomach bug" - to find out if you have a Norovirus induced food poisoning illness or a bacterial illness, a stool sample is necessary.

NOTE:  salmonella is much more prone to outbreaks in the late spring and summer, like a number of other bacteria.  So while the Norovirus virus is gearing up for a massive onslaught in the U.S., there may be a lull in bacterial outbreaks like salmonella.  For this reason, those of the approximately 48 million food borne illness victims each year should request a stool test when presenting for medical attention to know WHAT it is that they have become ill with.  Knowing the pathogen can help a victim trace their illness back to a source, and may, under certain circumstances, assist in preserving and/or securing possible legal rights.

Shigella Food Poisoning

by Shigella Lawyer Tony Coveny PhD, JD, MA


Shigella can be transmitted by the smallest amount of infection - a few as 100 cells is all that is needed to begin growing a colony of this bacteria in a victim's stomach and intestines.  Shigella Sonnei is the most common form of Shigella food poisoning, accounting for about 2/3 of all Shigellosis cases.  It causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, and in about a quarter of the cases, the diarrhea is bloody, like in E. coli cases, and the stool has mucus in it.  Reactive Arthritis, mostly following infection with Shigella Flexneri, occurs in about 3% of victims.  Also rare but potentially deadly, is Toxic Megacolon, or paralysis of the colon.  For more information on Shigella outbreaks or a Shigella lawsuit, contact Shigella lawyer Tony Coveny here.


Norovirus - the "Stomach Bug"

by Norovirus Lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD, JD, MA


Norovirus is the common "stomach bug" that gets talked about so much every year, with an outbreak season from Early November ot about mid-April.  Norovirus outbreaks are too common and very hard to stop, often infecting whole schools or retirement centers because the virus is so hardy and hard to eradicate.  Norovirus can survive on cold surfaces for hours or more, and have been know to infect buffet lines and salad bars.  Some outbreaks centered on restaurants have sickened hundreds in a matter of a single day or weekend.  Luckily, Norovirus illness is shorter in duration than many other food poisoning pathogens.  For more information about Norovirus outbreaks, a Norovirus lawsuit, or to speak to a Norovirus lawyer, contact Tony Coven here.


Vibrio - Raw Fish and other Seafood

By Vibrio Lawyer Tony Coveny, PhD, JD, MA


Vibrio is an unusual pathogen, getting into the American diet through saltwater food, such as shell fish, raw fish, or other seafood items that are not cooked or heated to the appropriate temperature. Two types of Vibrio infection have been recorded, V. Vulnificus (with an incubation period one day to a week) and V. Parahaemolyticus (usually between a couple hours and a couple days).  Oysters are the number one cause of human Vibrio food poisoning, along with other shell fish.  Consumers are warned to discard Oysters with shells that are open prior to cooking, and discard any shell fish whose shells do not open during cooking.  To discuss a Vibrio outbreak or Vibrio lawsuit, contact Vibrio Lawyer Tony Coveny here.


This leads to food being on the shelves that has been grown or manufactured without U.S. government oversight and without ever having been inspected or tested for pathogens like salmonella, Vibrio, Shigella, E. coli,Listeria, ciguatoxin, Cyclospora, or other pathogens.  This may not meant he food is bad, it just means the food is a potential source of a food borne outbreak and nobody will know about it until individuals  get sick.  Unfortunately, we have seen this happen over and again in recent years, with a major outbreak of Cyclospora linked to both cilantro and lettuce/salad mix from Mexico and pomegranate seeds imported from Turkey.  And often the buyer is unaware, as nothing tells a consumer where the food came from or what testing was, or was not, performed.  In the case of Townsend Farms Organic Anti-Oxidant frozen berries, this organic source came from an Oregon company.  A small notice on the package notified consumers that the product might contain ingredients for various other locales, but the product was primarily marketed as a U.S. organic berry mix - unfortunately, in contained Hepatitis A.  What's more, it was sold at one of America's premier retail outlets, Costco.  A few years back, the culprits were pepper imported from Vietnam and tuna imported from India (both contained Salmonella).   What consumer at a sushi bar, or putting pepper on his eggs at any restaurant in America, is going to inquire about eh source of the food or spices?


The answer?  We could ask for more governmental regulation, and that might be wise.  It may also be wise to simply make the cost of doing business match the value of doing business in the United States.  you may note many car companies suddenly issuing recalls because they know that a failure to act will cost them more, vis-a-vis lawsuits, than any inaction will save them.  Lawsuits use economic principles to make it costly for companies to engage in sloppy manufacturing and production by shifting the cost of that behavior (such as the injury or death of a victim from E. coli,Salmonella,Listeria,Campylobacter, or Hepatitis A) back to the company that caused it.  In short, without tax payer dollars being spent, companies are encouraged to behave responsibly.  This works in food importation too.  A well based food poisoning lawsuit will penalize bad players, and by making the companies that sell the food in the U.S., or serve it to their customers, liable, they in turn demand that the food be safe by instituting screening, testing, and quality controls.  Many people forget just how important a role personal injury lawsuits have played in the U.S., and continue to play in keeping our food safe.


Just a note: the same holds true for domestic food.  This last year a number of restaurants served food while recently scoring a laundry list of health and sanitation violations from local health inspections.  In other instances, companies with an internal testing procedure where shipping product prior to receiving the results of the tests, meaning that the product was in consumers' hands before the manufacturer even knew whether it contained salmonella.   These are behaviors thatfood poisoning lawsuits can change, and in so doing, keep the food we eat safe!

food poisoning lawyer food poisoning lawsuit

Riskier than ever - food is now universal - Legal counsel a must


By Food Poisoning Lawyer Tony Coveny, Ph.D.

Food distribution  is international, or universal, now.  It is imported from the four corners of the globe, including berries for Turkey, tuna form India, baby food from China, cantaloupe and cucumbers from Mexico, and avocados from Chile.  The challenge  comes down to monitoring this ever universal flow of food.  The U.S. Food and Drug Administration verifies only a small portion of all product coming into the U.S. (the FDA regulates most foods, except for non-fish meat, which is under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).  Under the USDA is the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) which, like the FDA, actually inspects very little of the imported product.



How do I Hire a Food Poisoning Lawyer?

by food poisoning lawyer Tony Coveny


 ~~ Hiring a food poisoning is basically hiring most personal injury lawyer who is familiar with food poisoning.  You should research the lawyers that do personal injury law and/or food poisoning cases and talk to one to see if you feel comfortable with that lawyer.  Which lawyer you pick is important, as you will work closely with them through this process - including what to seek in a food poisoning lawsuit, such as medical expenses and lost wages, but also the possibility of long-term illness from food poisoning which can happen in certain cases, such as IBS, IBD and other gastrointestinal problems following food poisoning.


If you have questions for food poisoning lawyer Tony Coveny,  just send him a note.  You can provide him more information, commentary, tips, or ask him about recent food recalls or food poisoning outbreaks.

by Food Poisoning Lawyer Tony Coveny, Ph.D.


These are the sort of things a food poisoning lawyer will ask, and each has a role to play in determining if you have a valid claim for damages or if you are a candidate for a food poisoning lawsuit.  

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